About Hepatitis

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About Hepatitis Blog

A food service worker at T&D Variety in Boothbay has Hepatitis A

The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention is warning consumers of possible hepatitis A exposure at a Boothbay convenience store.

A food service worker at T&D Variety at 601 Wiscasset Road, Boothbay, who was infected with hepatitis A, handled “to go” food on April 6 between 7 a.m. and 1 p.m., and on April 7 between 12:30 p.m. and 6 p.m., according to a release.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease transmitted by food or water. It is preventable with a vaccine.

Patrons who purchased particular “to order” foods from the store during those times could be at risk for hepatitis A infection. No pre-made deli meals or other food or beverages were potentially contaminated.

The Maine CDC recommends that any deli food items made to order between those hours on those days be discarded.

Anyone who may have eaten food prepared in the deli during those hours should receive a hepatitis A vaccine within 14 days of their potential exposure. Those who have documentation of completing the hepatitis A vaccine series are protected and do not need to receive additional vaccination doses.

Anyone who ate food prepared at or who worked at this store during those days and hours should watch for symptoms including tiredness, low appetite, stomach pain, nausea, dark urine, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes) and seek medical attention if they develop symptoms.

Symptoms of hepatitis A range from mild to severe sickness requiring hospitalization and can last several months.
Most adults have sudden symptoms, while most children younger than six do not have symptoms.

Symptoms begin to show 15-50 days after exposure. An infected person can spread the virus to others approximately two weeks before symptoms appear until one week after symptoms end.

Hepatitis A scare hits Los Angeles

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (Public Health) is working with Sunlife Organics Juice Bar in West Hollywood to alert consumers of a possible hepatitis A exposure. 
The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health identified hepatitis A virus infection in a food handler who worked at this location.

No additional cases have been identified at this time.

Public Health recommends hepatitis A vaccination for patrons who consumed food or beverages from Sunlife Organics in West Hollywood between March 14–17, 2022. Vaccination is not necessary for people who previously completed the hepatitis A vaccine series or are known to have a past infection. To prevent infection or reduce illness, hepatitis A vaccine should be administered within 14 days after a known exposure.

Hepatitis A vaccinations might be available through local pharmacies or physicians’ offices. In addition, Public Health will be offering free hepatitis A vaccinations to exposed persons at:

Hollywood Wilshire Health Center 
5205 Melrose Ave. 
Los Angeles, CA 90038

· Sunday, March 27, 2022 from 10am-1pm

· Monday, March 28, 2022 from 10am – 1pm

· Tuesday, March 29, 2022 from 8am – 4pm

Most people will have protective levels of antibody after one dose of the Hepatitis A vaccine but can choose to visit their primary care provider to complete the series with a second dose 6 months after receiving their first dose.

Hepatitis A is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis A virus. Hepatitis A causes acute liver disease, which may be severe. Hepatitis A is highly contagious and can be spread from person-to-person through the fecal-oral route (when contaminated feces from an infected person are somehow ingested by another person during close personal contact) or by eating or drinking contaminated food or water). Most adults with acute hepatitis A will have symptoms that may include fever, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark colored urine and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). There is no specific antiviral treatment.

Vaccination is the best way to prevent disease. In addition, infection can be prevented by vaccination within 14 days after a known exposure to a person with infectious hepatitis A. Older adults and people with weakened immune systems might benefit from receiving immune globulin (IG) in addition to hepatitis A vaccination for prevention after an exposure. For any questions about hepatitis A or the need for immune globulin, Public Health recommends that you speak to your primary care provider. If you do not have a regular provider, call 2-1-1 for assistance.

Public Health will continue monitoring all known individuals who may have been exposed to individuals ill with hepatitis A

Another restaurant with a Hepatitis A issue

The Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH), in cooperation with Huddle House in Hamilton, is investigating a food handler who is infected with hepatitis A virus. As a preventative measure, ADPH is suggesting customers who consumed food, whether dine-in, pickup, or delivery between the dates of July 9 through July 21, 2021, be identified. These patrons may need the hepatitis A vaccine or immune globulin to reduce their chance of illness.

Hepatitis A is a viral infection that can be transmitted person-to-person and by eating food or drinks prepared by an infected person. Hepatitis A vaccine can prevent infection, but only if given within 14 days of exposure to hepatitis A. The hepatitis A vaccine can be given to persons over 12 months of age who have not completed the two-dose hepatitis A vaccine series. Persons over 40 years old may also receive immune globulin.

“Adults with hepatitis A may have symptoms that include fatigue, low appetite, stomach pain, nausea and jaundice. These symptoms usually resolve within two months of infection,” said Dr. Burnestine Taylor, Medical Officer for Disease Control and Prevention, ADPH. “Children less than 6 years of age generally do not have symptoms or have an unrecognized infection. Almost all people who get hepatitis A recover completely.”

If you have eaten food prepared at Huddle House, located at 210 River Road, Hamilton, Alabama, between the dates of July 9 through July 21, 2021, contact your health care provider, pharmacy, or the Marion County Health Department regarding getting the vaccine as soon as possible. You may also contact your local provider if you are uncertain about your past vaccine status.

It is rare for hepatitis A to cause severe illness, but persons 50 years of age or older and those with other liver disease are more at risk. The best way to prevent getting hepatitis A is to receive the vaccine within the first two weeks after exposure. Those who have previously been vaccinated with one dose of Hepatitis A vaccine need a second dose. Two doses are required to be considered protected from exposure.

Out of an abundance of caution, the restaurants in both Hamilton and Winfield were closed for commercial cleaning.

Hepatitis A scare at Zayde’s Deli in Memphis

A case of hepatitis A has been diagnosed in an employee who recently handled food at Zayde’s Deli located at 6560 Poplar Avenue. This employee worked during a period of time when ill or infectious and potentially exposed customers to the virus.

Anyone who consumed food or drink at Zayde’s Deli or consumed take-out meals from the restaurant between June 29th and July 7th, is advised to receive a hepatitis A vaccination as soon as possible as a preventative measure. Potentially exposed persons may receive the vaccination from their health care provider or from one of the Health Department’s clinics listed here: https://www.shelbytnhealth.com/Facilities. While no appointment is needed, appointments may be made by calling our appointment line at 901-222-9980.

Hepatitis A is usually transmitted from person to person through contact with contaminated feces or consumption of contaminated food or water. Symptoms include fever, abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea or vomiting, dark urine, weight loss and yellow skin and eyes.

“If given within 14 days of exposure, the hepatitis A vaccine is highly effective in preventing infection among those exposed to the virus,” said Shelby County Health Officer Dr. Bruce Randolph. “The Health Department is offering hepatitis A vaccination free of charge to those who may have been exposed at this restaurant.”

Roma Sausage and Deli link in Hepatitis A scare

The Oneida County Health Department has learned that an employee of Roma Sausage and Deli has tested positive for Hepatitis A. The employee worked while infectious and may have exposed people who were customers of the shop.

The Health Department is alerting those who consumed tomato pie from either of Roma Sausage and Deli’s locations at Washington Mills or Utica of the potential exposure.

The Hepatitis vaccine is available if given within two weeks of exposure. For those who consumed tomato pie prepared by the shop on March 27, 28, 30, or 31, you must receive preventive treatment within 14 days of exposure.

If exposed on: Need vaccination by:
March 27 April 10
March 28 April 11
March 30 April 13
March 31 April 14

Oneida County Health Department is setting up Hepatitis A vaccination clinics for April 10-13. Please visit www.ocgov.net to schedule an appointment or contact your healthcare provider to be given the vaccination.

Those who consumed tomato pie from Roma’s during the period of March 23-26, are past the window to receive the vaccine, but should monitor themselves for symptoms. According to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, symptoms of Hepatitis A include:

·         Yellow skin or eyes
·         Lack of appetite
·         Upset stomach
·         Stomach pain
·         Vomiting
·         Fever
·         Dark urine or light colored stools
·         Joint pain
·         Diarrhea
·         Fatigue

Symptoms commonly appear within 28 days of exposure, with a range of 15 to 50 days.  Hepatitis A is transmitted by consuming food or drinks or by using utensils that have been handled by an infected person. It may also be spread from person to person by ingesting something that has been contaminated by the infected person. Casual contact, such as sitting together, does not spread the virus. If you have any of these symptoms, please contact the Oneida County Health Department or your health care provider.

Roma Sausage and Deli has been notified of potential Hepatitis A exposure and is cooperating with OCHD. Follow-up inspections will occur.

If you have had the COVID-19 vaccine within the past two weeks you can get the Hepatitis A vaccine.  If you are scheduled to have a COVID-19 vaccine within two weeks of the Hepatitis A vaccine, your COVID-19 vaccination should be rescheduled to two weeks after the Hepatitis A vaccination.

“All those who are eligible to get vaccinated for Hepatitis A should,” said Daniel W. Gilmore, Ph.D. MPH, Director of Health. “In addition, continue good hygiene practices, especially handwashing.”

Brady's Steaks and Seafood Employees have Hepatitis A

The Mississippi State Department of Health (MSDH) is investigating two cases of hepatitis A in Jackson County restaurant employees which may have led to possible exposure for customers.

Two employees of Brady’s Steaks and Seafood, 3801 Magnolia St. in Pascagoula have been diagnosed with hepatitis A infection, and worked at the restaurant while potentially infectious. Customers who ate at the restaurant between March 1 and April 3, 2021, may have been exposed to hepatitis A. At this time, there is no indication of an ongoing risk associated with the restaurant.

All individuals who ate at the restaurant between March 1 and April 3 should watch for any possible symptoms of hepatitis A and see their doctor if they become ill. Individuals who ate at the restaurant within the last two weeks should get a hepatitis A vaccination if not previously vaccinated. Vaccination can prevent hepatitis A only if given within 14 days of exposure.

Those who may have eaten at the restaurant within the last two weeks can receive a hepatitis A vaccination free of charge from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday, April 8th at the Jackson County Health Department, 46000 Lt. Eugene J. Majure Drive, in Pascagoula.

“The risk of transmission of hepatitis A in this situation is likely very low. However, as a precaution, we recommend that anyone who ate food from this restaurant within the last two weeks should consider getting a hepatitis A vaccination if they have not done so already. All individuals who may have been exposed between March 1 and April 3 should watch for any possible symptoms of hepatitis A and see their doctor if they become ill,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Paul Byers.

“The management and staff of Brady’s are fully cooperating with MSDH to prevent illnesses as a result of this exposure,” said Byers.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that causes fever, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes), abdominal pain and dark colored urine. Hepatitis A usually spreads when a person unknowingly ingests the virus from objects, food or drinks contaminated by small, undetected amounts of stool (feces) from an infected person. If you think you have symptoms of hepatitis A, you should contact your healthcare provider.

Everyone can prevent the spread of hepatitis A by carefully washing hands with soap and water, including under the fingernails, after using the bathroom or changing diapers, and before preparing or eating food.

“The risk of transmission of hepatitis A in this situation is likely very low. However, as a precaution, we recommend that anyone who ate food from this restaurant within the last two weeks should consider getting a hepatitis A vaccination if they have not done so already. All individuals who may have been exposed between March 1 and April 3 should watch for any possible symptoms of hepatitis A and see their doctor if they become ill,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Paul Byers.

“The management and staff of Brady’s are fully cooperating with MSDH to prevent illnesses as a result of this exposure,” said Byers.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that causes fever, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes), abdominal pain and dark colored urine. Hepatitis A usually spreads when a person unknowingly ingests the virus from objects, food or drinks contaminated by small, undetected amounts of stool (feces) from an infected person.

If you think you have symptoms of hepatitis A, you should contact your healthcare provider.

Everyone can prevent the spread of hepatitis A by carefully washing hands with soap and water, including under the fingernails, after using the bathroom or changing diapers, and before preparing or eating food.

“The risk of transmission of hepatitis A in this situation is likely very low. However, as a precaution, we recommend that anyone who ate food from this restaurant within the last two weeks should consider getting a hepatitis A vaccination if they have not done so already. All individuals who may have been exposed between March 1 and April 3 should watch for any possible symptoms of hepatitis A and see their doctor if they become ill,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Paul Byers.

“The management and staff of Brady’s are fully cooperating with MSDH to prevent illnesses as a result of this exposure,” said Byers.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that causes fever, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes), abdominal pain and dark colored urine. Hepatitis A usually spreads when a person unknowingly ingests the virus from objects, food or drinks contaminated by small, undetected amounts of stool (feces) from an infected person. If you think you have symptoms of hepatitis A, you should contact your healthcare provider.

Everyone can prevent the spread of hepatitis A by carefully washing hands with soap and water, including under the fingernails, after using the bathroom or changing diapers, and before preparing or eating food.

Another Food Service Worker with Hepatitis A

The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention (Maine CDC) has identified a case of acute hepatitis A virus infection in an Orono, Maine, food service worker. The individual handled food while infectious on the following dates: March 6-9, March 13-16, and March 20-21, 2021.

Epidemiological assessment of the employee’s illness determined that patrons of the establishment may be at risk for hepatitis A infection. Maine CDC recommends that anyone who ate food prepared at or who worked at the Circle K at 2 Stillwater Avenue in Orono, Maine, from March 13 through 16 and March 20 through 21 receive hepatitis A vaccine within 14 days of their potential exposure. There is a 14-day window during which prophylaxis is effective after exposure.

Anyone who ate food prepared at or who worked at this establishment from March 6 through 9, 2021, is outside the window for which prophylaxis is recommended. Such individuals are advised to watch for symptoms and seek medical attention should they develop symptoms (see below). Health care providers are encouraged to remain vigilant for hepatitis A infection in persons with consistent symptoms and should ask individuals with such symptoms about consumption of food from or working at this establishment during this period.

Trading Post restaurant in New York tied to Hepatitis A scare

People who ate at the Trading Post Restaurant on October 18th, October 20th, October 23rd, October 25th or October 28th, were potentially exposed to hepatitis A.  Most people do not get sick when an employee at a restaurant has hepatitis A, but there is still a risk.

As a result of this risk, those who might have been exposed should monitor themselves for signs and symptoms of Hepatitis A over the next 50 days.   Signs and symptoms of Hepatitis A include: fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark colored urine, clay-colored stools, joint pain, or jaundice.  If you develop symptoms, contact your health care provider and be sure to tell them that you may have been exposed to Hepatitis A.

If anyone ate at the restaurant on days other than those listed above, there was no exposure.  The restaurant remains open and under no restrictions.  The owner and staff at the restaurant have been very cooperative with our investigation and there is currently no ongoing concern or risk to patrons.

The Birches Resort has a Hepatitis A problem

The Maine CDC says customers of a Moosehead Lake restaurant could be at risk of contracting hepatitis A.

Health officials say a worker at The Birches Resort in Rockwood, who was ill with hepatitis A, handled food while infectious between Sept. 2 and 22.

According to the Maine CDC, an assessment of the employee’s illness determined that restaurant patrons may be at risk for hepatitis A infection.

The Maine CDC recommends that anyone who may have eaten food prepared at The Birches Resort Restaurant or worked at the restaurant from Sept. 16 through Sept. 22 receive hepatitis A vaccine within 14 days of their potential exposure. There is a 14-day window during which prophylaxis is effective after exposure.

Anyone who may have had dine-in, take-out, delivery, or curbside pickup of food from the restaurant should ask a medical provider about receiving the vaccine.

People who visited the restaurant from Sept. 2 through Sept. 15 are outside the window for which prophylaxis is recommended but are advised to watch for symptoms and seek medical attention should symptoms develop, according to the Maine CDC.

Individuals with compromised immune systems or children younger than one year old who visited the restaurant during this time may benefit from hepatitis A immune globulin (IG), upon consultation with their health care providers.

The Maine CDC says the best way to prevent hepatitis A infection is to get vaccinated.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus. Symptoms range from mild illness to a severe sickness that requires hospitalization and can last several months.

Most adults with hepatitis A have a sudden onset of symptoms such as tiredness, low appetite, stomach pain, nausea, dark urine, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes). Most children younger than 6 years old do not have symptoms or have an unrecognized infection.

Hepatitis A can be spread through contaminated food or water, especially in food prepared by a person who is infected. Symptoms begin to show 15-50 days after exposure to the virus. An infected person can spread the virus to others approximately two weeks before symptoms start until one week after symptoms end.

Saco House of Pizza in Saco linked to Hepatitis A scare in food service worker

The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention (Maine CDC) has identified a case of acute hepatitis A virus infection in a Saco food service worker.

The individual handled food at Saco House of Pizza in Saco while infectious from August 5, 2020, through August 21, 2020. While this employee was not in charge of preparing food, the individual had access to food in the kitchen.

Maine CDC’s assessment of the employee’s illness determined that restaurant patrons and employees may be at risk for hepatitis A infection. Out of an abundance of caution, Maine CDC recommends that anyone who may have eaten food prepared at Saco House of Pizza or worked at the restaurant from August 18, 2020, through August 21, 2020, promptly receive hepatitis A vaccine, as there is a 14-day window during which prophylaxis is effective after exposure. This includes anyone who may have had take-out, delivery, or curbside pickup of food from the restaurant.

Anyone who visited the restaurant from August 5, 2020, through August 17, 2020, is outside the timeframe for which prophylaxis is recommended but should watch for symptoms and seek medical attention if symptoms develop. Individuals with compromised immune systems or children younger than one year old who visited the restaurant during this time may benefit from hepatitis A immune globulin (IG), upon consultation with their health care providers.

The best way to prevent hepatitis A infection is to get vaccinated.

Hepatitis A is a vaccine-preventable, contagious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus. Symptoms range from mild illness to a severe sickness that requires hospitalization and can last several months. Most adults with hepatitis A have a sudden onset of symptoms such as tiredness, low appetite, stomach pain, nausea, dark urine, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes). Most children younger than 6 years old do not have symptoms or have an unrecognized infection.

Hepatitis A can be spread through contaminated food or water, especially in food prepared by a person who is infected. Symptoms begin to show 15-50 days after exposure to the virus. An infected person can spread the virus to others from approximately two weeks before symptoms start until one week after symptoms end.

Health care providers are encouraged to remain vigilant for hepatitis A infection in persons with consistent symptoms.

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