About Hepatitis

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About Hepatitis Blog

A food service worker at T&D Variety in Boothbay has Hepatitis A

The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention is warning consumers of possible hepatitis A exposure at a Boothbay convenience store.

A food service worker at T&D Variety at 601 Wiscasset Road, Boothbay, who was infected with hepatitis A, handled “to go” food on April 6 between 7 a.m. and 1 p.m., and on April 7 between 12:30 p.m. and 6 p.m., according to a release.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease transmitted by food or water. It is preventable with a vaccine.

Patrons who purchased particular “to order” foods from the store during those times could be at risk for hepatitis A infection. No pre-made deli meals or other food or beverages were potentially contaminated.

The Maine CDC recommends that any deli food items made to order between those hours on those days be discarded.

Anyone who may have eaten food prepared in the deli during those hours should receive a hepatitis A vaccine within 14 days of their potential exposure. Those who have documentation of completing the hepatitis A vaccine series are protected and do not need to receive additional vaccination doses.

Anyone who ate food prepared at or who worked at this store during those days and hours should watch for symptoms including tiredness, low appetite, stomach pain, nausea, dark urine, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes) and seek medical attention if they develop symptoms.

Symptoms of hepatitis A range from mild to severe sickness requiring hospitalization and can last several months.
Most adults have sudden symptoms, while most children younger than six do not have symptoms.

Symptoms begin to show 15-50 days after exposure. An infected person can spread the virus to others approximately two weeks before symptoms appear until one week after symptoms end.

Hepatitis A scare hits Los Angeles

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (Public Health) is working with Sunlife Organics Juice Bar in West Hollywood to alert consumers of a possible hepatitis A exposure. 
The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health identified hepatitis A virus infection in a food handler who worked at this location.

No additional cases have been identified at this time.

Public Health recommends hepatitis A vaccination for patrons who consumed food or beverages from Sunlife Organics in West Hollywood between March 14–17, 2022. Vaccination is not necessary for people who previously completed the hepatitis A vaccine series or are known to have a past infection. To prevent infection or reduce illness, hepatitis A vaccine should be administered within 14 days after a known exposure.

Hepatitis A vaccinations might be available through local pharmacies or physicians’ offices. In addition, Public Health will be offering free hepatitis A vaccinations to exposed persons at:

Hollywood Wilshire Health Center 
5205 Melrose Ave. 
Los Angeles, CA 90038

· Sunday, March 27, 2022 from 10am-1pm

· Monday, March 28, 2022 from 10am – 1pm

· Tuesday, March 29, 2022 from 8am – 4pm

Most people will have protective levels of antibody after one dose of the Hepatitis A vaccine but can choose to visit their primary care provider to complete the series with a second dose 6 months after receiving their first dose.

Hepatitis A is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis A virus. Hepatitis A causes acute liver disease, which may be severe. Hepatitis A is highly contagious and can be spread from person-to-person through the fecal-oral route (when contaminated feces from an infected person are somehow ingested by another person during close personal contact) or by eating or drinking contaminated food or water). Most adults with acute hepatitis A will have symptoms that may include fever, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark colored urine and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). There is no specific antiviral treatment.

Vaccination is the best way to prevent disease. In addition, infection can be prevented by vaccination within 14 days after a known exposure to a person with infectious hepatitis A. Older adults and people with weakened immune systems might benefit from receiving immune globulin (IG) in addition to hepatitis A vaccination for prevention after an exposure. For any questions about hepatitis A or the need for immune globulin, Public Health recommends that you speak to your primary care provider. If you do not have a regular provider, call 2-1-1 for assistance.

Public Health will continue monitoring all known individuals who may have been exposed to individuals ill with hepatitis A

Gino's linked to Hepatitis A Outbreak that has sickened 10 with 3 dead

A Montgomery County restaurant reopened Monday following a hepatitis A investigation.

Gino’s Ristorante and Pizzeria closed on Jan. 7. Ten total cases are being reviewed and three people have died from the virus.

On Jan. 7, the popular family-owned restaurant that opened back in 1972 was forced to temporarily close following a hepatitis A investigation.

According to the Montgomery County Health Department, of the 10 confirmed cases, seven people were hospitalized and three have died.

While the source of the outbreak has not been confirmed, officials say they traced the virus to back to this site in late November but can’t say if it was a worker or contaminated food product.

What you need to know during a Hepatitis A outbreak

The Roanoke City and Alleghany Health Districts (RCAHD) in Virginia announced that RCAHD has identified a total of 50 confirmed primary cases and 2 secondary cases of hepatitis A. There have been at least 31 hospitalizations and unfortunately 3 deaths linked to Famous Anthony’s restaurants.

Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Hepatitis A outbreaks. The Hepatitis A lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Hepatitis A and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $800 million for clients. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.

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What is Hepatitis A?

Hepatitis A is the only common vaccine-preventable foodborne disease in the United States. It is one of five human hepatitis viruses that primarily infect the human liver and cause human illness. Unlike hepatitis B and C, hepatitis A doesn’t develop into chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis, but in rare cases infection with hepatitis A virus can lead to a more rapid onset of liver failure and death.

How do you contract Hepatitis A?

Hepatitis A is a contagious disease that is transmitted by the “fecal – oral route,” either through person-to-person contact or contaminated food or water. Food-related outbreaks are usually traced to food that has been contaminated by an infected food handler. Fresh produce contaminated during cultivation, harvesting, processing, and distribution has also been a source of hepatitis A.

What are the signs and symptoms of Hepatitis A?

Symptoms typically begin about 28 days after infection but can begin as early as 15 days or as late as 50 days after exposure. Symptoms may include headache, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal discomfort, fatigue, joint pain, dark urine, clay colored bowel movements, and fever. Jaundice, a yellowish discoloration of the skin and whites of the eyes, occurs in most cases. Hepatitis A may cause no symptoms at all when it is contracted, especially in children. Those infected usually recover fully within 2 to 6 months.

What to do if you become infected with Hepatitis A:

Infection is determined by a blood test. If you know you have been exposed to hepatitis A, immune globulin shots or a hepatitis A vaccine can reduce your chance of infection by up to 90%.

How to Prevent a Hepatitis A Infection:

Ask your health care provider about vaccination – there are many reasons to seriously consider it, including working with food or ill persons, travel, or an impaired immune system. Children who contract hepatitis A but have no symptoms can also pass the virus through ordinary play to their parents. Make sure your childcare providers are vaccinated and be aware of friends and relatives who may have traveled to countries with high rates of infection. Stay alert to notices of outbreaks to determine if your family has been exposed.

A History of Hepatitis A Lawsuits

The hepatitis A lawyers of Marler Clark have many years of experience working with clients on Hepatitis A outbreak lawsuits.

Hepatitis A is one of five human hepatitis viruses (hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E) that primarily infect the liver and cause illness. It is a communicable (or contagious) disease that spreads from person-to-person through fecal-oral contact, often from an infected food handler contaminating food. The cases the Marler Clark hepatitis A lawyers have been involved in have generally resulted from contaminated food or water.

An estimated 80,000 hepatitis A cases and an estimated 100 deaths due to acute liver failure brought on by hepatitis A occur each year in the U.S. The rate of infection has dramatically decreased since the hepatitis A vaccine was licensed and became available in 1995. Despite the decrease in hepatitis A cases nationally, Marler Clark has represented clients young and old who have become ill with hepatitis A after eating contaminated food or who were exposed to the virus and had to receive an injection to prevent illness.

The Marler Clark hepatitis A attorneys have unmatched experience representing victims of hepatitis A. Our law firm represented victims of notable hepatitis A outbreaks such as the 2003 Chi Chi’s hepatitis A outbreak, the 2005 California lettuce hepatitis A outbreak, and the 2010 Quad-Cities McDonald’s hepatitis A outbreak. Contact us today to learn more about our services.

Roanoke Famous Anthony’s restaurants Hepatitis A Outbreak

An employee who worked at three Famous Anthony’s restaurant locations in Roanoke has been diagnosed with hepatitis A. As a result, the Roanoke City and Alleghany Health Districts (RCAHD) announced today that anyone who visited any of these three Famous Anthony’s locations — 4913 Grandin Road, 6499 Williamson Road or 2221 Crystal Spring Ave. — from August 10 through 26 only, may have been exposed.

The RCAHD is currently investigating nine cases of hepatitis A associated with this exposure.

To protect your health and prevent further spread of illness, if you meet these criteria and are not vaccinated against hepatitis A, please monitor yourself for these symptoms:

• jaundice: yellowing of the skin or the eyes,
• fever,
• fatigue,
• loss of appetite,
• nausea,
• vomiting,
• abdominal pain,
• dark urine, or
• light-colored stools.

If you develop any of these symptoms, please seek medical care and let your healthcare provider know of your possible exposure. It is also very important for people with symptoms to stay home from work, especially if they work in food service, health care or child care.

Another restaurant with a Hepatitis A issue

The Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH), in cooperation with Huddle House in Hamilton, is investigating a food handler who is infected with hepatitis A virus. As a preventative measure, ADPH is suggesting customers who consumed food, whether dine-in, pickup, or delivery between the dates of July 9 through July 21, 2021, be identified. These patrons may need the hepatitis A vaccine or immune globulin to reduce their chance of illness.

Hepatitis A is a viral infection that can be transmitted person-to-person and by eating food or drinks prepared by an infected person. Hepatitis A vaccine can prevent infection, but only if given within 14 days of exposure to hepatitis A. The hepatitis A vaccine can be given to persons over 12 months of age who have not completed the two-dose hepatitis A vaccine series. Persons over 40 years old may also receive immune globulin.

“Adults with hepatitis A may have symptoms that include fatigue, low appetite, stomach pain, nausea and jaundice. These symptoms usually resolve within two months of infection,” said Dr. Burnestine Taylor, Medical Officer for Disease Control and Prevention, ADPH. “Children less than 6 years of age generally do not have symptoms or have an unrecognized infection. Almost all people who get hepatitis A recover completely.”

If you have eaten food prepared at Huddle House, located at 210 River Road, Hamilton, Alabama, between the dates of July 9 through July 21, 2021, contact your health care provider, pharmacy, or the Marion County Health Department regarding getting the vaccine as soon as possible. You may also contact your local provider if you are uncertain about your past vaccine status.

It is rare for hepatitis A to cause severe illness, but persons 50 years of age or older and those with other liver disease are more at risk. The best way to prevent getting hepatitis A is to receive the vaccine within the first two weeks after exposure. Those who have previously been vaccinated with one dose of Hepatitis A vaccine need a second dose. Two doses are required to be considered protected from exposure.

Out of an abundance of caution, the restaurants in both Hamilton and Winfield were closed for commercial cleaning.

Hepatitis A scare at Zayde’s Deli in Memphis

A case of hepatitis A has been diagnosed in an employee who recently handled food at Zayde’s Deli located at 6560 Poplar Avenue. This employee worked during a period of time when ill or infectious and potentially exposed customers to the virus.

Anyone who consumed food or drink at Zayde’s Deli or consumed take-out meals from the restaurant between June 29th and July 7th, is advised to receive a hepatitis A vaccination as soon as possible as a preventative measure. Potentially exposed persons may receive the vaccination from their health care provider or from one of the Health Department’s clinics listed here: https://www.shelbytnhealth.com/Facilities. While no appointment is needed, appointments may be made by calling our appointment line at 901-222-9980.

Hepatitis A is usually transmitted from person to person through contact with contaminated feces or consumption of contaminated food or water. Symptoms include fever, abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea or vomiting, dark urine, weight loss and yellow skin and eyes.

“If given within 14 days of exposure, the hepatitis A vaccine is highly effective in preventing infection among those exposed to the virus,” said Shelby County Health Officer Dr. Bruce Randolph. “The Health Department is offering hepatitis A vaccination free of charge to those who may have been exposed at this restaurant.”

Mustard linked to Hepatitis A ill worker

People who ate at The Mustard Seed Restaurant (31 E Main Street Fredonia, NY) between April 1 and May 19, 2021 were potentially exposed to hepatitis A. Most people do not get sick when an employee at a restaurant has hepatitis A, but there is still  a risk. People who may have been exposed should receive treatment to prevent infection.

“While the risk of hepatitis A infection is low, we must act prudently to prevent the spread of this very contagious disease,” said Christine Schuyler, County Public Health Director.  “Anyone who may have eaten at this restaurant during this timeframe should check their immunization status and if not already vaccinated against hepatitis A, come to our free clinic this Saturday or visit their healthcare provider if they are experiencing symptoms.”

As a result of this potential hepatitis A exposure, the Chautauqua County Health Department is advising anyone who ate  food at or consumed takeout food from the restaurant between May 8 and May 19 to receive a free hepatitis A vaccine tomorrow, May 22 at a clinic planned by the department. The clinic will be held at SUNY Fredonia’s Steele Hall (280 Central Ave Fredonia, NY 14063) from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM.

The hepatitis A vaccine or immune globulin is only effective within two weeks of exposure to the virus. People who ate at The Mustard Seed Restaurant between May 8 and May 19 (and have not been previously vaccinated against hepatitis A) should receive the hepatitis A vaccine or immune globulin  as soon as possible. Walk-ins and pre-registration for the clinic are both acceptable. Visit chqgov.com or http://bit.ly/hepa52121 to pre- register. Please bring your driver’s license or another form of identification.

Those who ate at The Mustard Seed Restaurant between April 1 and May 7 may have been exposed, but the hepatitis A vaccine given this weekend will not prevent infection from this exposure. These persons are encouraged to monitor themselves and their families for symptoms for 50 days after consuming the food. Symptoms may include: fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark-colored urine, clay-colored stools, joint pain, or jaundice. If you have any symptoms, contact your healthcare provider and be sure to tell them  that you may have been exposed to hepatitis A.

Clinics are for those who ate at the Mustard Seed Restaurant in Fredonia between May 8, 2021 and May 18, 2021.  Or got take out or catered frood from the restaurant in that same time frame.  Please be prepared to tell us the date and time that you ate food from the restaurant as well as what you ate or drank. Provide receipts from your purchase if at all possible.

  • Tuesday, May 25th 4:30pm-6:30pm at
    Cassadaga Valley School Bus Garage
    5935 Route 60
    Sinclairville, NY 14782
    Clinic Sign Up  
  • Friday, May 28th 3:00pm-7:00pm at
    SUNY Fredonia Steele Hall
    280 Central Avenue
    Track and field facility
    Fredonia, NY 14063
    Clinic Sign Up 

What to know about Hepatitis A

Viral hepatitis is a major global public health problem affecting hundreds of millions of people and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Five biologically unrelated hepatotropic viruses cause most of the global burden of viral hepatitis: hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D (delta) virus (HDV), and hepatitis E virus (HEV).  

Hepatitis A is a communicable (or contagious) disease that is acquired primarily by the fecal oral route either from person to person or through contaminated food or water. Food-related outbreaks are most commonly associated with contamination of food during preparation by an HAV-infected food handler. The food handler may not recognize they are contagious or ill because the peak time of infectivity—that is, when the most virus is present in the stool of an infected individual—occurs during the two weeks before symptoms begin. The clinical manifestations and duration of illness vary a great deal, with many persons, especially young children, showing no symptoms at all. The clinical signs of HAV infection include dark urine and, sometimes, clay-colored stool, often accompanied or followed by jaundice. Associated symptoms may involve fever, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, headache, and extreme fatigue. Hepatitis A is the only common vaccine-preventable foodborne disease in the United States. Each year, approximately 3,700 to 10,000 cases of hepatitis A occur in the United States.

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